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DOH-MANATEE PROVIDES NALOXONE TO REDUCE SUBSTANCE ABUSE DEATHS

By Christopher Tittel

January 20, 2023

Life-saving kits offered at no cost, confidentially and on walk-in basis

 

Contact:

Christopher Tittel, Communication Director

Christopher.Tittel@FLHealth.gov

(941) 720-6145

 

Bradenton, Fla. – The Florida Department of Health in Manatee County (DOH-Manatee) is now distributing naloxone (Narcan), a lifesaving medication that could reduce thousands of substance abuse deaths across the state.

 

DOH-Manatee offers naloxone at no cost and on a confidential basis to anyone age 18 or older who is at risk of experiencing an opioid overdose themselves or at risk of witnessing an opioid overdose (such as caregivers, family members and friends).

 

The Department dispenses naloxone kits – which include two nasal sprays that can be administered even without a health care professional present – on a walk-in basis (no appointment necessary).

 

People using naloxone receive educational material, referrals and connections for substance abuse intervention.

 

DOH-Manatee offers the kits Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at two locations: Main Campus, located at 410 Sixth Avenue East, and Manatee South Center, located at 7780 Westmoreland Drive (corner of Westmoreland Drive and US41).

 

For more information on naloxone distribution, call (941) 242-6663.

 

“DOH-Manatee is pleased to join select community partners in offering naloxone as part of a statewide effort to save lives at risk due to substance use disorder and overdose,” said DOH-Manatee Health Officer Dr. Jennifer Bencie.

 

Naloxone is a medication that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose, restoring breathing and consciousness within minutes of being administered to a person who has overdosed. Naloxone can be administered by a bystander (non-health-care professional) before emergency medical assistance becomes available, but it is not intended to substitute for professional medical care. Individuals should call 9-1-1 immediately when an opioid overdose is suspected, before administering naloxone.

 

Increasing access to naloxone is a critical component in battling the opioid epidemic, especially in rural areas or counties with limited access to health care. Providing naloxone through county health departments will increase support to individuals across the state dealing with substance use disorder and help prevent overdose deaths in Florida.

 

The Florida Department of Health is working with the Florida Department of Children and Families through the Overdose Prevention Program, or iSaveFL, which facilitates the distribution of naloxone kits to families, friends and caregivers of those at risk for an opioid overdose. The iSaveFL website provides information on finding naloxone in your community and resources on treatment, overdose education and prevention.

 

Gov. Ron DeSantis has launched the Coordinated Opioid Recovery (CORE) program – the first of its kind in the nation – to provide comprehensive and sustainable care to those affected by substance use disorder. This initiative is part of the state’s response to the overdose crisis.

 

For more information on CORE in Manatee County, call (941) 780-9408.

 

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The Department, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board, works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts.

 

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